Book Club: Rebecca

Tonight on the GeekNights Book Club, we discuss Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca. A classic, and the basis for the well regarded Hitchcock movie, we enjoyed it, and you should too.

Politics Club: The Coming Third Reich

In the inaugural GeekNights Politics Club episode, with guests Andrew and the other Scott, we discuss Richard J. Evans' The Coming of the Third Reich.

From Amazon:
" There is no story in twentieth-century history more important to understand than Hitler’s rise to power and the collapse of civilization in Nazi Germany. With The Coming of the Third Reich , Richard Evans, one of the world’s most distinguished historians, has written the definitive account for our time. A masterful synthesis of a vast body of scholarly work integrated with important new research and interpretations."

This is part one, as we segue into contemporary politics in a part two that is forthcoming.

Book Club: Oryx and Crake

Tonight on the GeekNights Book Club, we review and discuss (with spoilers, obviously), Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake. We enjoyed it thoroughly, and had a lot to say. Gene-fueled science fiction dystopia, too-real commercialization of life itself, and a short read to boot, we had no choice but to make this - the first of the MaddAddam Trilogy) our GeekNights Book Club choice.

The Eye of the World

Tonight on the GeekNights Book Club we discuss the first book in Robert Jordan's famous epic fantasy series "The Wheel of Time" entitled "The Eye of the World." There is no news in this episode since we pushed it out in a hurry before Rym went on a business trip.

Wool

Tonight on the GeekNights Book Club, we review (spoilers) Hugh Howey's Wool. It was a solid book (or set of five short books, which are really just two short books and one longer book). Mixes of Paranoia (the RPG), Logan's Run, Fallout, and other similar stories, it had a lot more nuance than we expected. Definitely worth reading.

GeekNights Book Club: Idoru

Tonight on the GeekNights Book Club, we discuss William Gibson's Idoru. It's a product of its time - the 1990s - showcasing both the promise and the dystopia projected from that era. Wildly inconsistent in its treatment of technology (fax machines, disposable cameras, and IR remote controls exist alongside city-building nanotechnology and true AI), steeped in the cyberpunk aesthetic, it is typical of Gibson and of its era. If we had to say what it's truly about, it's fame, information, and adolescence. The Idol herself, as AI, is not the core of this book: don't read it expecting to be blown away with a deep look at at the Sharon Apple story. The side details, the setting, the meta, are what make this book worthwhile.

In the news (related in some way to the book), Max Martin is the man behind the idols, and Google Glass prescription frames are allowing Rym to take one more step toward cyberization.

The Player of Games

Tonight on the GeekNights Book Club, we discuss Iain M Banks' The Player of Games. If ever there was a novel that was in our wheelhouse, it's this one. We also talk briefly about some of our more recent Kickstarter backings, and enjoy the "that guys" we poked on Reddit after one fifth of our Anime Boston performances.

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