Money Making Games - MAGFest X

Rym and Scott of GeekNights (www.frontrowcrew.com) appeared on two panels at MagFest X - "Gamer Motivations" and "Money Making Games" - and also presented a lecture: "Beyond Dungeons & Dragons." In "Money Making Games," alongside Dr. Chris Hazard (who you likely know from Achron (http://www.achrongame.com/)), the many myriad issues around game design in the context of monetization, along with several tangents, are discussed. This was part of the MAGFest "Gaming Intellectuals" track of programming.

If you enjoy this, many more of our GeekNights panels and lectures from other conventions are available on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD03FB08 4B11A0454

Beyond Dungeons & Dragons - MAGFest X

Rym and Scott of GeekNights (www.frontrowcrew.com) appeared on two panels at MagFest X, and also performed this lecture: Beyond Dungeons & Dragons. Herein, they discuss the nature of role playing games, what their mechanics really mean, how they affect play, and why D&D is probably not the best system for the kinds of games you're trying to play.

There is a huge catalog of "indie" tabletop RPGs just as there is for videogames. Burning Wheel, Dogs in the Vineyard, Inspectres, Lacuna, A Thousand and One Nights, Mouse Guard, Prime Time Adventures, Pendragon, Freemarket, Dread, Kagematsu, Apocalypse World, these are a TINY smattering of the possibilities. Play the game that affords the play style best suited to your story, not the one everyone just happens to know the rules for.

If you enjoy this, many more of our lectures from other conventions are available on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD03FB084B11A0454

PAX Prime 2011: Highlights - Spy vs Spy and Sopwith

Rym and Scott of GeekNights (www.frontrowcrew.com) presented "Discover the Forgotten Masters" at PAX Prime 2011. Discussing many largely forgotten games, including Sopwith, Spy vs Spy, Aerobiz, Outlaw, Metal Marines, and more, they consider what can be learned from these lost treasures, both for game players and game designers.

PAX Prime 2011 - Highlights: Outlaw

Rym and Scott of GeekNights presented "Discover the Forgotten Masters" at PAX Prime 2011. In this lecture, they went over several largely forgotten games/genres, covering the mechanics, histories, and other factors that make them not only masterful, but ripe for being remade.

One of these games was Outlaw for the Atari 2600.

How to Win at Games - Conclusion

GeekNights presented "How to Win at Games" at PAX East 2011. As part of the lecture, they went into great detail as to how to win at "Stratego" and "Settlers of Catan." Unfortunately, as the audio device on stage failed during the lecture, the latter will not be available online.

Here is the conclusion to the panel. Apologies for the audio: it was the best that could be done. Be sure to catch the bulk of the event in this Youtube channel!

How to Win at Games

The final GeekNights lecture from PAX East 2011, we discuss winning (and not the Charlie Sheen kind). Specifically, we discuss how one actually wins at games, what winning really means, and why so few people are very good at it. In the words of Herm Edwards: "You play to win the game."

A warning: out primary audio device failed near the very end of the video, forcing us to switch to the backup. The last ten minutes of the lecture will be available as soon as we can master said audio to be reasonably understandable.

Game Mechanics and Mechanism Design

  • Saturday July 30, 2011
  • #pax

GeekNights presented three lectures at PAX East 2011, among them "Game Mechanics and Mechanism Design." Here, Rym and Scott introduce the audience to the bare basics of Game Theory so as to be able to explain how important a field of study called "Mechanism Design" should be (but isn't) to gaming and game design.

In short summary, "Mechanism Design" is the study of games from an interested perspective. That is to say, that the game designer has a vested interest in the play and outcome of the game. In many ways, games are mind control. It is in the best interest of game players and game designers to understand how this works and what effects it can have.

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