Online Gambling Technology

Tonight on GeekNights, we consider the technology concerns of online gambling, itself a microcosm of Internet security and trust concerns in general. In the news, Ballmer steps down as Microsoft CEO (likely signaling a change of direction for the company), so we consider what Microsoft could do to win back the hearts and minds of, well, anyone. In other news, don't confuse unpublished SDKs in flux with malice (yet) when Google's Chromecast beta stops working with your application.

Don't forget to some see is at PAX Prime 2013, where we'll be presenting Bad Games, and also at the Pre-PAX Sky High Tabletop Play Benefitting Food Lifeline!

The Levels of Protecting Your Privacy

Tonight on GeekNights, in light of recent non-revelations about the activities of the NSA, we discuss how you can protect yourself, your associations, and your communication. It comes down to the levels of inconvenience with which you are willing to deal. But first, Rym reviews Citibike in New York, and how quickmeme was taken out.

Level 1

Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5
  • GPG Voip
Level 6 Level 7
  • Burner Laptops
  • Ridiculous Spy Bullshit
  • Preternatural Forethought

RSS and Google Reader

Tonight on GeekNights, in light of Google Reader's death, we discuss why we've been saying for years that RSS is, at best, dying a slow death. We further discuss whether or not it's best to call the police on an agitated, aggressive homeless man, or to let him remain agitated and aggressive on his own. In the news, CISPA's passing the house gave us a nice list of who to never vote for again, baseball coding software couldn't account for a crazy thing that happened in a game, and acetaminophen may affect the brain in ways you didn't realize.

Also, Futurama was re-canceled, and GeekNights is going to Australia!

High Bandwidth Content Distribution

Tonight on GeekNights, we consider how video (and other high bandwidth one-way content) is distributed on the Internet, including a brief history of satellite television in North America and how its unresolved issues remain to this day. In the news, FOX threatens to go cable-only if Aereo isn't shut down, different levels of shady are occurring with ISPs and HTML content, and France doesn't understand the Streisand Effect. Rym enjoyed a bomb scare outside his office, Amazon amazingly mis-delivered a package, wallets seem to be the hot thing to Kickstart, and Lawdingo seems like an interesting way to find a lawyer.

Internet Governance

Tonight on GeekNights, we consider a topic which should be much more boring than it is: the governance of the Internet, particularly in light of the US's recent refusal to sign a UN treaty related to it. Before that, Rym has further adventures in HVAC, Twitter opens up your tweet history, we lament the "web we lost" and what that really means (hint: an eventual move to a federated replacement for Twitter, or possible to a future G+), we consider the resurgence of an ancient argument about ad blocking (spoiler: if you give me data, I will do with it what I will), and we wonder on the idea that an API could be considered a National Treasure.

Also, ConnectiCon 2013 Panel and Workshop submissions are live! And, we launched a new show! GeekNights Presents. And, we're going to MAGFest! And, you should spread the word on our video content if you want us to make more of it!

Internet Relay Chat

Tonight on GeekNights, we discuss IRC (Internet Relay Chat), from a historical, functional, and cultural perspective (which we've lectured on before). We also consider the uproar around advertisements in Ubuntu (and its ramifications for the state of Desktop Linux, nevermind the idea that the worst computer users need the best hardware) and Twitter takes a nice tack on copyright takedowns. Rym acquired some delicious Applejack, Gchat never truly replaced AIM/ICQ, and a fox with bombs reminds us to celebrate Guy Fawkes day.

Most importantly, Ponies are coming.

Contributing to Open Source Projects

Tonight on GeekNights, we discuss the contribution of code or other assets to Open Source projects, focusing on some of the barriers to doing so (e.g., drama, non-code assets, community issues, and so forth). Also, Amazon engages in full DRM-dickitude, and Italy jails scientists for failing to predict an earthquake (echoing North Carolina's ridiculous proposed anti-science legislation).

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