Watership Down

Tonight on GeekNights, we finally talk about Watership Down now that Scott has read it (it only took him eight months)! It's a fine book worthy of the wide praise it continues to receive. In the news, Nebraska begins a possible turn of the tide as it becomes the first conservative US state since the early 70s to ban the death penalty, and FIFA is beginning to get what it deserves. If you're thinking of seeing Manhattanhenge in person: don't. Just look at these photos instead.

Book Club: A Canticle for Leibowitz

Tonight on the GeekNights Book Club, we discuss A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller. It was definitely worth reading as an example of one of the first modern post-apocalyptic stories. It reads like an author exploring an idea (the idea being nuclear holocaust and the nature of man and technology), and presents ambivalent, sometimes contrary themes. In the news, New York failed at time capsule, we consider stealing the Westinghouse Time Capsules, you should check out the Hatsune Miku Expo, as well as this SECRET BURGER CRAWL, and Ghibli's The Tale of Princess Kaguya (assuming you're in New York).

Wool

Tonight on the GeekNights Book Club, we review (spoilers) Hugh Howey's Wool. It was a solid book (or set of five short books, which are really just two short books and one longer book). Mixes of Paranoia (the RPG), Logan's Run, Fallout, and other similar stories, it had a lot more nuance than we expected. Definitely worth reading.

The Player of Games

Tonight on the GeekNights Book Club, we discuss Iain M Banks' The Player of Games. If ever there was a novel that was in our wheelhouse, it's this one. We also talk briefly about some of our more recent Kickstarter backings, and enjoy the "that guys" we poked on Reddit after one fifth of our Anime Boston performances.

The Name of the Wind

Tonight on the GeekNights Book Club, we review Patrick Rothfuss's The Name of the Wind.

This is the riveting first-person narrative of Kvothe, a young man who grows to be one of the most notorious magicians his world has ever seen. From his childhood in a troupe of traveling players, to years spent as a near-feral orphan in a crime-riddled city, to his daringly brazen yet successful bid to enter a legendary school of magic, The Name of the Wind is a masterpiece that transports readers into the body and mind of a wizard.

All in all, it's OK. Not great, not terrible, enjoyable enough, but not quite as fun as The Lies of Locke Lamora. Do note that we are at times quite harsh on the work, its merits nonwithstanding. Simply put, the book is not bad, or else we would actually have little to say. It is good enough that we must bring to bear our strongest criticisms, for it falls just short of being excellent. We both look forward to the continued growth of the author, and consider this a wonderful young adult fantasy novel.

We've discussed this book on two other occasions: relating to arrows and knees, and just as we'd finished it.

Carl Sagan's Cosmos

Tonight on GeekNights it's the book club discussing Carl Sagan's Cosmos. The next book club selection is The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch. In the news we discuss FIFA World Cup 2010.

Creative Commons License