Sunglasses

Tonight on GeekNights, we talk about sunglasses. Also a little at the end about roller coasters. Ecigs definitely leave an odor residue (distinctive of "brown permanent marker"). Apple announced some stuff, including a ridiculous monitor we both want but can't get. There was also a squandered incident involving a fan.

Anime We Never Reviewed

Tonight on GeekNights, as we struggle to watch enough new anime to warrant serious reviews in a timely fashion, we talk about some of the bigger shows we've, for various reasons, never actually reviewed. Roughly: Kaze no Yojimbo, Nadesico, KOR (Kimagure Orange Road), Marmalade Boy, Fushigi Yugi, Inu Yasha, Kodocha, MKR (Magic Knight Rayearth), Lodoss War, AMG (Ah My Goddess!), and Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood, Conqueror of Shamballa.

In the news, Saturday Morning Cartoons are dead and Mathew Klickstein, now (thankfully) kicked out of presenting at the New York Comic Con, revealed through his bizarre and racist rant in a recent interview just how, well, racist he is.

Book Club: A Canticle for Leibowitz

Tonight on the GeekNights Book Club, we discuss A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller. It was definitely worth reading as an example of one of the first modern post-apocalyptic stories. It reads like an author exploring an idea (the idea being nuclear holocaust and the nature of man and technology), and presents ambivalent, sometimes contrary themes. In the news, New York failed at time capsule, we consider stealing the Westinghouse Time Capsules, you should check out the Hatsune Miku Expo, as well as this SECRET BURGER CRAWL, and Ghibli's The Tale of Princess Kaguya (assuming you're in New York).

Pandante

Tonight on GeekNights, we review Pandante, which is far more fun than it has any right to be. It distills the interesting/fun parts of Texas Holdem and is an excellent social/starter game. Floosh. Before that, Rym has some praise for Five Nights at Freddy's (it is easily the most stressful game he has ever played), and Smash Brothers is finally coming for the 3DS.

Live in Australia - Full Schedule

We are happy to announce that Rym will be in Australia for PAX Aus 2014 in Melbourne, VIC (October 31-November 2)! He will be presenting two lectures!

How to Win Every Game
Friday 11:00am
Fruitbat Theatre

It seems obvious that, when playing a game of skill, one attempts to win. Interestingly, this is often not the case, and even skilled gamers rarely analyze to any real depth the underlying mechanics and strategy of a given game. By deconstructing the games we play, you too can make them far less fun for yourself and beat the everliving hell out of your friends. We'll hit the theory pretty heavily, but also specific examples from games like "Stratego," "Settlers of Catan," and even "Football."

Losing
Saturday 2:00pm
Fruitbat Theatre

Winning is good, and losing is bad. We strive to win, and this is the basis for most of the games we play. Challenges are binary: we either overcome them, advancing the story, or fail, and must try again. But, what if we were to toss this conventional wisdom aside? Do we really only have fun when we win? Have you ever had that moment in a game where epic and total failure was the most memorable part? What kinds of games would arise if we strove to make losing, instead of winning, the point?


This is the final, updated schedule. Come say hi!

Posted: Friday October 10, 2014

How to Win Every Game
PAX Prime 2014

It seems obvious that, when playing a game of skill, one attempts to win. Interestingly, this is often not the case, and even skilled gamers rarely analyze to any real depth the underlying mechanics and strategy of a given game. By deconstructing the games we play, you too can make them far less fun for yourself and beat the everliving hell out of your friends. We'll hit the theory pretty heavily, but also specific examples from games like Stratego, Settlers of Catan, and even Football.

Book Club - A Canticle for Liebowitz

Since reading Wool, we've discovered this particular sub-genre of post apocalyptic tales where all of human society is sealed in or trapped in some place. Even though there are many examples, almost all of them are relatively obscure things only geeks like us would know about. Logan's Run, Fallout, Wool, Phoenix Vol. 2: Future, Paranoia the tabletop RPG, etc.

Well, it was brought to our attention that the first work of this nature is a 1960 sci-fi novel entitled "A Canticle for Liebowitz" by Walter M. Miller, Jr. As soon as I heard of the book the frequency illusion set in. I ran into the book two or three more times, and it easily became the next book club selection.

A Canticle for Leibowitz is a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel by American writer Walter M. Miller, Jr., first published in 1960. Set in a Catholic monastery in the desert of the Southwestern United States after a devastating nuclear war, the story spans thousands of years as civilization rebuilds itself. The monks of the fictional Albertian Order of Leibowitz take up the mission of preserving the surviving remnants of man's scientific knowledge until the day the outside world is again ready for it. -Wikipedia

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