Judge Anime by its Cover - Fall 2017

  • Tuesday September 26, 2017
  • #anime

Welcome to the first episode of GeekNights Judges Anime by its Cover!

We used to host this panel every year at Anime Boston, but now we are making it a quarterly video show. Armed with nothing more than the title, studio, a short description, and a small preview image, we will let you know which TV anime coming out next season are worth watching, and which ones should be avoided at all costs.

We honestly don't know much about these new anime and are judging them based on almost nothing, so be sure to post lots of hate comments! We want to hear all about everything we got wrong.

And when this season is over, be sure to come back and let us know how right or wrong we were about these shows. Our track record in the past has been really good, but we are sure to have more misses when we take more shots.

Special thanks to Anime Boston for letting us get this started in the first place. It's really a fantastic convention. Any anime fan in the Northeastern US should definitely attend.

Anime Boston

And of course none of this would be even remotely possible without the excellent web site AniChart.net. They organize all this information so well every single season.

AniChart.net

See you in the Winter!

The Rage of the Quitter - PAX West 2017

The Rage of the Quitter
PAX West 2017

The table gets flipped. The healer sits down in spawn and plays Rick Astley over the voice chat. The tournament ends in chaos. Friendships die. Why does the quitter rage so? This panel will explore the inglorious exits of gaming. Presented live at PAX West 2017 in the Hippogriff Theatre.

Play (Dirty) to Win - PAX East 2017

Play (Dirty) to Win: PAX East 2017

Ostensibly, you play games to win. (Assuming we're talking about competitive games: you're not playing to "win" Dungeons & Dragons… are you?) But are really? Shouldn't you be winning a lot more often? Maybe you should try that cheap strategy you've heard about. Punch below the belt. Memorize the deck. Read the FAQ. What's the line between playing to win and cheating? Is "playing dirty" even really a thing? Come for the degenerate strategies, stay for the soul-crushing revelations on winning.

Presented by GeekNights at PAX East 2017.

Quitting: MAGFest 2017

Quitting: MAGFest 2017

Ragequit isn't the only form of quitting. People stop playing games for a huge range of reasons. They get bored, they get frustrated, they get distracted, they sometimes literally just forget. It seems simple, but it isn't. Quitting is an option that's there whether the game designer wants it or not, an instrinsic mechanic of all games, and it's a far deeper topic than you might expect.

Presented by GeekNights at Magfest 2017 as part of the MAGES track.

Why Five Nights at Freddy's is Scary

Why Five Nights at Freddy's is Scary

Five Nights at Freddy's is undeniably scary. While it relies on jumpscares, notice that it uses them not to scare you along the way, but more to condition you for much greater and sustained fright and paranoia. FNAF is a clever, well-designed, simple horror game that in many ways has redefined horror games as a genre.

What exactly makes Five Nights at Freddy's so scary? What game mechanics does it employ to do this?

The Grind - PAX West 2016

The Grind: PAX Prime

The Grind. We've all experienced it. We've all complained about it. Some of us secretly love it. But ask 100 people what it actually IS, and you'll get 40 different answers. Join us for a mechanical discussion of what "grinding" really means in games. Is it necessary for a "classic MMO?" Is it part of the genre of a "JRPG?" Does it exist in board games? Is it bad? Is it good? Is it necessary? Part storytelling, part game design, part game theory—let's explore the grind from all angles.

Atari Game Design - PAX East 2016

Atari Game Design
PAX East 2016

Game design is a wide subject. The best approach to mastering it is to focus on the fundamentals, and what better place to do that than with Atari 2600 games? Join us for a deep game design analysis of classic competitive Atari games like Outlaw, and how their core concepts extend to modern games. When you can literally count the pixels with your eyes, and the code will fit in your calculator, the core principles of good (and bad) design become starkly apparent.

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