Cucumber Quest

Tonight on GeekNights, we review the delightful webcomic Cucumber Quest by Gigi d.g. Beautiful art, great characters: in some ways a cross between the fantasy parts of Bone and the zany fun of Adventure Time. But first, Sailor Moon Crystal is basically being reanimated in a style more like the original anime on Blu Ray, so there's literally no reason to watch it on TV/Crunchyroll. Rym gives us a brief review of Rick and Morty (of which he is a great fan), and Brian K. Vaughan is in New York (as you should be).

Will AI Destroy Us?

Tonight on GeekNights, we consider whether Artificial Intelligence (in the future tech magic sense) will destroy humanity or make everything awesome. Will AIs replace us, or will they treat us the way we treat ants? In the news, T-Mobile continues to play catch-up, but will have Uncarrier 8.0 tomorrow, HIV is evolving to be less infectious/deadly, and morons are angry at flickr for their own moronitude about what the Creative Commons license actually means.

Busses

Tonight on GeekNights, we discuss busses, possibly the worst form of transportation. In the news, the pirate bay has been shut down again, this time possibly for good, dim people are suing Adblock, adblocking software is escalating the war on ads (though this is not new to people who actually know things), and Internt ads are mostly clicked on by bots likely run by organized crime, making the whole thing a giant money laundering scam. (See also some free-to-play games).

Wizard

Tonight on GeekNights, we review Wizard, which was the GeekNights breakout game of PAX Australia 2014! In the news, there was officiating/game drama at the Dreamhack Winter CounterStrike tournament (leading to some debate in the forum), and Tekken fans are mad about a new character in Tekken. Also, be sure to come see us at PAX South!

Live at PAX South 2015!

We are happy to announce that GeekNights will be in San Antonio Texas for PAX South 2015. We will be presenting (in the very least) a lecture titled "Bad Games."

Bad Games
Sunday, January 25th
4:30pm
Armadillo Theatre.

We've all played "bad" games, but what truly makes a game "bad?" Is one's miserable experience not simply subjective opinion? It turns out that the problem is not in defining what makes a game "bad," but in what makes a game a "game." Candyland teaches children colors and counting, but is terrible for a serious tournament. Dungeons & Dragons is great for that heroic fantasy adventure, but not so much for your future cyberpunk transhumanist court drama.

Posted: Tuesday December 2, 2014

The History of Losing
PAX Australia 2014

I presented "Losing" at PAX Australia 2014. This is an excerpt from that lecture covering, essentially, single player videogames. From Super Meat Boy to Silver Surfer, Don't Shit Your Pants to The Stanley Parable, Five Nights at Freddy's to Gone Home, I consider Narratives of Victory, and Narratives of Failure.

Book Club - A Canticle for Liebowitz

Since reading Wool, we've discovered this particular sub-genre of post apocalyptic tales where all of human society is sealed in or trapped in some place. Even though there are many examples, almost all of them are relatively obscure things only geeks like us would know about. Logan's Run, Fallout, Wool, Phoenix Vol. 2: Future, Paranoia the tabletop RPG, etc.

Well, it was brought to our attention that the first work of this nature is a 1960 sci-fi novel entitled "A Canticle for Liebowitz" by Walter M. Miller, Jr. As soon as I heard of the book the frequency illusion set in. I ran into the book two or three more times, and it easily became the next book club selection.

A Canticle for Leibowitz is a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel by American writer Walter M. Miller, Jr., first published in 1960. Set in a Catholic monastery in the desert of the Southwestern United States after a devastating nuclear war, the story spans thousands of years as civilization rebuilds itself. The monks of the fictional Albertian Order of Leibowitz take up the mission of preserving the surviving remnants of man's scientific knowledge until the day the outside world is again ready for it. -Wikipedia

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